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Return to Articles about Driving

Tips To Get Your Car Through A Cold Winter

by: Steve Wilcott
Everyone wants to save money on car repairs, right?

Make it a point to schedule into your calendar a winter booster check for your car.

Keep these tips in mind for your winter travel, and youíll have a safer winter travel season all around!

A gas tank which is kept filled helps keep moisture from forming. Make it a habit to go ahead and fill up when your tank is half empty.

Change your oil and oil filter every 3,000 miles or so if your driving is mostly stop-and-go or consists of frequent short trips. Personally, I'd change my oil every 2000 miles, regardless. It will save you loads of trouble in the long run. Go ahead. Schedule it into the planner.

Wiper blades are one of those things we usually never think about until we need them, and they're not working! Have you ever tried driving in sleet and snow with impaired visibility, thanks to dud wipers? Talk about nerve-wracking! Go ahead and replace old wiper blades. If your climate is harsh, purchase rubber-clad (winter) blades to fight ice build-up. Stock up on windshield washer solvent. You'll be surprised how much you use. And, of course, carry an ice-scraper. I keep one in the car, and one in the house Ė just in case my doors freeze and I canít open them immediately.

Make sure your heater and defroster are in good working condition.

Worn tires don't help any time of year, least of all in winter weather. Examine tires for remaining tread life, uneven wearing, and cupping; check the sidewalls for cuts and nicks. It's a good idea to check tire pressures once a month. Let the tires "cool down" before checking the pressure. Don't forget to rotate your tires, too!

Make sure you have a spare and that the jack is in good condition.

Be prepared for emergencies, even if you live in a warmer climate. A winter emergency list should include gloves, boots, blankets, flares, a small shovel, sand or kitty litter, tire chains, a flash light, and a cell phone. Put a few "high-energy" snacks in your glove box. You can buy survival aids in the camping section of your sporting goods store.

It may take you less than an hour to get your car checked for winter and prepare for any emergency. That's time well spent and it can save you a giant headache this winter season!
Indeed, it could even save your life and the lives of those you love.

About the author:
This article courtesy of http://www.mustang-tips.com




 

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